Reflections on today’s writing

The children have all written a reflection on their persuasive letters – examples from Sam, Elwood, Juliette and Adam below.  I am keen that they all have an opinion about each piece of writing that they produce and that this is more important to them than anything that I may think about their work.  Experience has shown me that as soon as a young writer cares about his or her words, and develops pride as a writer, they are on a good track.  They are mostly proud of their work today which is really encouraging.

I feel proud of my letter.  I clearly think that it tells Ms Atkins what to do, how to do it and why to do it.  I also included things like “Perhaps even worse” and “not only that” plus facts to back up my argument.  My favourite sentence is: “This is an issue young people care about and we must put a stop to it.” I think it is very persuasive and will catch Ms Atkins’ attention.

Sam

I feel proud of my work because I like the facts and I think I can catch Miss Atkins’ attention with my letter.  My favourite part is the bit about the scale of how much plastic is thrown away. I think the facts will shake her.  I learnt lots of new spellings like “banning” and “first”.

Elwood

I feel proud about my letter because I think it sounds persuasive.  I gave a solution and I think everyone’s letters would persuade Ms Atkins and I hope she will change things.  I think my first paragraph will inform Ms Atkins what the letter is about. I always get the spelling of “which” wrong and always writing it like “wich”, which I need to change, which, which which, which, which!  I’ve used linking phrases like “in particular” and “also this is a problem”. I’ve tried hard on my handwriting and I think I’ve improved. The sentence I like best is the one I worked on with Kia which is “The impact of plastic is a problem for planet Earth and our generation.”

Juliette

I am proud of my letter.  I think it is very persuasive.  It says what the problem is and how to solve it.  I included linking phrases like “in addition” and “another concern”.  My favourite sentence was, “Let me give you the breakdown” because it’s funny and it’s like me.

Adam

Persuasive writing

Enjoy excellent persuasive letters to Ms Atkins from Oscar, Reuben, Rafi and Kia, arguing that we should reduce the amount of single-use plastic at Rosendale.  We’ll have to see what Ms Atkins has to say but they’ve certainly convinced me.

Dear Ms Atkins

As a person who cares about our planet, I am writing about the issue of single-use plastic in Rosendale Primary. The main problem in our school is the plastic cups in afterschool and breakfast club.

Did you know that 500 billion plastic cups are used every year? We do not want to be part of that. It is a shocking fact that five trillion plastic bags are used worldwide each year – and 99% are thrown away.  Not only that but there is more than one tonne of plastic for every person alive today.

The impact of plastic is a big problem for our environment. We should all be aware of the following facts:
– There are five trillion pieces of plastic in all the world’s oceans
– Experts think that there will soon be more plastic in the sea than fish
– 100,000 animals are killed by plastic each year.

I am sure you will agree that we need to do something about the amount of plastic we use at Rosendale. This is an important problem that we need to turn around. We should take the decision to ban plastic cups in breakfast club and afterschool club.

Yours sincerely

Oscar de Cruz

Dear Ms Atkins

I’ve wanted to tell you about single-use plastic for ages now. The main problem in our school is with us using single-use plastic cups in afterschool club and it’s terrible!

Did you know that five trillion plastic bags are used every year? Even more shocking, one million plastic bottles are used every minute. It is also a sad truth that 500 billion disposable cups are consumed every year.

The impact of single-use plastic is getting worse by the minute, literally, because hundreds of plastic bottles are thrown away every minute. The following facts make the problem clear:
– ⅓ of turtles (which mistake plastic for jellyfish) have died
– 100,000 sea animals die each year
– 9/10 of seabirds have eaten plastic
– Experts think that by 2050 the amount of plastic in the ocean will weigh more than the amount of fish.
– The Pacific Garbage Patch is three times bigger than France
– There are five trillion pieces of plastic in the world’s oceans.

I’m sure you’ll agree that you should let us be the leaders and we could stop using plastic cups. This is an issue that young people who care about our planet can understand and they can help us change the world.

Yours sincerely

Reuben Walusimbi

Dear Ms Atkins

Most people know that single-use plastic is a danger to the Earth and at Rosendale we use too much of it. The main way Rosendale is adding to the global problem is we are using single-use plastic cups at afterschool club.

Not everyone is aware that 500 billion plastic cups are used every year. Did you know that 1 million plastic bottles are sold every minute? It is also a fact that five trillion plastic bags are used worldwide each year and 99% are thrown away. I was shocked to learn that each living human owns a tonne of plastic.

Single-use plastic is a worldwide catastrophe that we need to address. We should all be aware of the following facts:
– 90% of seabirds have mistaken plastic for fish
– Experts think that by 2050 there will be more plastic than fish in the sea
– One in three turtles have eaten a plastic bag.
– Each year, 100,000 sea creatures are killed by plastic.

It is clear that plastic is very destructive so we need to take action starting with no plastic cups in afterschool club.

Yours sincerely

Rafi Aziz

 

Dear Ms Atkins

I’ve been wanting to tell you about single-use plastic for a long time now. This letter is especially aimed at breakfast club and afterschool club too. I want you to tell them to use reusable cups which can be washed and used again.

Did you know that 500 billion single-use plastic are used each year? Not only that, it is a little known fact that over one million plastic bottles are used by humans every minute.

The impact of plastic is a BIG problem for planet Earth and our generation. Let me tell you some interesting facts:
– Every year 100,000 sea animals are killed by plastic
– Soon there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish
– The Pacific Garbage Patch is three times bigger than France.

I’m sure you will agree that we need to stop this and we need to start using recyclable cups in afterschool club and breakfast club. Young children like us care about our planet and the world we live in.

Yours sincerely

Kia Sturgeon

Research on single-use plastic

In English, we have begun working on persuasive writing techniques. Among other things, we will be writing a letter to Ms Atkins about single-use plastic in the school.

Today, we did some background research on the use of plastic and considered these staggering statistics.

– There is more than one tonne of plastic in the world for every person alive today
– Humans buy about 1 million plastic bottles per minute
– 500 billion disposable cups are consumed every year.
– 5000 billion plastic bags are used worldwide each year, of which 99% are thrown away.  A plastic bag has an average “working life” of 15 minutes.
– By 2050, the amount of plastic in the ocean is expected to weigh more than the amount of fish.

If you can find out more about the environmental impact of plastic, then please share with the class tomorrow ahead of our writing.

Great Pacific Garbge Patch
Great Pacific Garbage Patch (three times the size of France) lying between California and Hawaii

Newspaper article

Here’s Chyanne’s  newspaper article on the trial of the wolf to enjoy.  All of the children’s extended writing books will be available at parents evening for you to read.

An innocent wolf, who says he was hoodwinked by a local girl, has been accused of trying to eat her and her grandma last evening.

The wolf, known to his friends as Wolfinio, is said to be a kind, generous, untreacherous wolf who would oftentimes help out with granny’s housework and other things.   But every Saturday, Little Red Riding Hood would come over. And she would always bring these awful toffees which stuck gran’s teeth together. Whenever he tried to speak to her, she would just ignore him.

Yesterday afternoon, the wolf was out looking for fresh herbs and padded near by her.  When he tried to pass the time of day with her, she pretended not to know him (he says she was prejudiced towards wolves) and carried on.  The pure-bred Wolfio went to warn granny about the girl’s sticky, sickly toffees and arrived when she was trying to reach one of her favourite frocks.  By trying to help grandma, she got knocked out cold and fell into the cupboard. Wolfinio did not want to upset the girl by making her think he had done something bad!  So he had to put on gran’s dress and pretend nothing was wrong. After they had some “small talk” she was just about to put one of those sticky toffees in his mouth, when, he couldn’t help it!  He pounced out of bed, causing Little Red to scream. It is reported that then the woodcutter came in shouting like a maniac as he heard the commotion and, when Wolfinio caught a glimpse of the axe, he leaped out of the window just after his tail got slashed off.

We asked if the girl was planning revenge.  “Yes! I’m thinking of drowning him,” threatened Little Red Riding Hood.  The reporter then asked the wolf what it felt like to be accused of planning to eat an old lady.  “It was horrible and so unfair,” exclaimed the wolf.

All the town citizens are waiting for the judge’s verdict and hoping for a good decision.  All the dogs, foxes and wolves are hoping that Wolfinio is going to be found innocent and welcomed back to normal life.

Press conference

61ozU2YbYUL._SX258_BO1,204,203,200_

As we continue to investigate The Wolf’s Story in our English lessons, Ms Boothroyd took on the role of the wolf when answering probing questions from the class at a press conference about his conduct in the affair with Little Red Riding Hood.  She gave some very concerning answers.  Please discuss these at home and see whether you can spot any holes or inconsistencies in the Wolf’s story.

Q: How long have you been a vegetarian?
A: On and off for about two years – I do like a bit of meat now and then though.

Q: What was it like to be accused of eating an old lady?
A: It was horrible. It was so unfair. I’d never eat an old lady – it’s not my favourite type of food anyway.

Q: How do you know granny is not your favourite type of meat if you’ve never tried any?
A: I might have tried it once. I can’t remember. Just a little nibble.

Q: Perhaps you prefer young girls for dinner?
A: Certainly not – that hasn’t happened for absolutely ages.

Q: Have you ever tried eating a granny?
A: NO! I would never eat someone that old.

Q: How do you feel about having your tail cut off?
A: I was very annoyed. It hurt a lot.

Q: Are you lying?
A: Of course not. What a ridiculous question!

Q: Have you ever blown down three little pigs’ houses?
A: I’ve never blown down a brick house.

Q: You said you’d never eat an old lady but you didn’t mention adults and children.
A: I’ve already told you that I’m a vegetarian.

Q: What do you do in your spare time?
A: I like to go for walks in the woods.

Q: The police are offering a reward for anyone who has any information on you. How does that feel?  A: It’s completely scandalous. Why should an innocent wolf be harassed like this?

Then Meli gave some feisty and combative responses at her press conference in the role of Little Red Riding Hood

Q: Are you planning to take revenge on the wolf?
A: Yes! I’m thinking of drowning him!

Q: Why did you scream when the wolf jumped out of bed?
A: Because he was going to eat me. The wolf is lying about being a vegetarian. I heard him say he’s an “on and off” veggie. What on earth does that mean?!

Q: What was scariest about the wolf?
A: His teeth! They looked very sharp.

Q: Has the wolf eaten any other members of your family?
A: Not as far as I know.

Q: How does it feel to be involved in a crime investigation like this?
A: Very scary. I’m worried that the wolf might be found not guilty and come back to try to eat me again!

Q: Do you have any wolf friends? No.
A: They are scary, sharp-toothed, lying, greedy, untrustworthy animals

 

Brockwell Park in autumn – poems (2)

Poems by Tom, Annie, Adam, Elwood, Hetty, Chyanne, Kia, Lilah and Macie

Scooting through Brockwell Park, what can I feel?
The autumn chill
The sun shining through the trees
The soft, leathery surface of a leaf
A smooth, chocolate brown conker
A squidgy fungus.

Scooting through Brockwell Park, what can I see?
Colourful leaves and vibrant trees
Leaves decorating the path with
An emerald, orange and fire coloured carpet.
Leaves playing around on their branches
A leaf slowly fluttering down like a dying butterfly
My breath clouding in front of me.

Scooting through Brockwell Park, what can I hear?
The autumn breeze whispering in my ear
Parakeets tweeting crazy tunes
Dogs barking at squirrels
Traffic on the road ahead
Crunching leaves below my feet.
Tom

 

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I see?
Leaves surfing down like a kite floating to the ground
A carpet of amber, gold and cherry red filling the grey path
Squirrels gathering nuts, hibernating hedgehogs
And birds flying far and wide.

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I hear?
The crunching of leaves
Like burnt bacon
Parakeets screeching
Bursts of lime green in the sky.

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I feel?
The damp dew on the grass below
The smooth conker shells
Wood brown
Cold breeze on my face
By my foot a silky pigeon feather
As I dropped it, it floated to the damp grass.
Annie

 

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I see?
Leaves shivering on trees like they
Have frostbite
Swaying like a boat on a choppy sea
Waiting for their time to come
Then they let go of the branch
And ride the wind like a
Professional surfer
Before they start pushing for space
On the ground
Like a rugby scrum.

Walking through Brockwell park
What can I hear?
Parakeets screeching
Dogs barking at squirrels
The wind singing to me
People stepping on leaves that
Crunch under their feet like crisp packets.

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I feel?
The autumn chill in the breeze
Blowing in my face
Dampness
Dew
The smooth surface of a
Conker in my palm
That feels like a sheet of
Laminated paper.
I can feel it’s autumn.
Adam

 

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I see?
Squirrels fighting over acorns
Honey coloured leaves waiting to fall
Chestnuts falling like bombs!
Spiders hiding everywhere you look
Slugs waiting for rain.

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I hear?
The drone of cars on the road
The beating wings of the parakeets
The almost silent sound of the autumn breeze.

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I feel?
I feel the autumn breeze on my cheeks
I feel damp, wet, honey gold leaves
The ground is slippery and when you skid
You leave marks like slime.
Elwood

 

Walking through Brockwell Park
I can see
Acorns dropping with their friends
And family
Saying its autumn.
I can see
Leaves pushing and shoving
While I walk through the swimming pool of
Candy red, lemony yellow
And salad green leaves.

Walking through Brockwell Park
I can hear
The leaves crunching while children play.
I can hear
Parakeets screaming in the
Autumn air.
I can hear
The trees swishing in the cold
Frosty air.

Walking through Brockwell Park
I can feel
The cold autumn breeze on my face
Making me cold.
I can feel
The wet silky conkers
I can feel
The crispy rust red
Leaves under my feet.
Hetty

 

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I see?
Autumn leaves shape-shifting into tornadoes
From jade green to rust red and then crispy gold and brown
Leaves are like vibrant birds migrating through wind
Ready to say bye bye summer and shuffle off trees
As they glide down they make autumn’s carpet
Their time has come to become pieces of the earth.

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I hear?
The scene of autumn
Exploding conkers
Scurrying squirrel footsteps on dry leaves
The flapping of a parakeet
As it goes higher and higher
Fainter and fainter
Such wonderful times that give a tingle of joy
In your spine
When bursts of children laughing reaches your ears!

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I feel?
A slight chill of autumn appearing
Whistling wind on my icy toes
The concrete as uneven as can be
Beneath the conkers and acorns
The soggy grass is my mushroom grotto
I can feel the autumn signal engaging my interest
A time for the sparkling, glittering sun above me.
Chyanne

 

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I see?
Leaves crunching and crackling like crisps
Lots of leaves scattered around like
The people in the underground
A carpet of leaves over the muddy grass.

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I hear?
A sound of autumn calling me
To play outside
The wind blowing leaves
Crunching under your feet
Dogs barking to the wind.

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I feel?
A slight chill of air whipping on my cheeks
A wet, damp, marmalade leaf lying on the earth
The damp pavement like an ice skating rink
I pick up a smooth conker shell
And CRACK it went
And the shiny conker popped out.
Kia

 

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I see?
A carpet of crunchy brown leaves
Leaves scattered everywhere on
The floor like a really bad crowd
Bugs crawling in the tree
Like people in a village
Conkers falling off the tree like coconuts.

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I hear?
Parakeets singing to me
Leaves crunching in my ear
Trees rustling like a toy shaker.

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I feel?
The autumn breeze making my ears sting
My body feels cold through like its
Frozen to ice
I can feel a red leaf so soft that
I can rub it on my ruby cheeks.
Lilah

 

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I see?
Lots of twisted trees
Really cool clouds
The leaves dancing.

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I hear?
Children collecting conkers
Parakeets screeching for food
Dogs running and barking
The autumn song.

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I feel?
Wet damp grass that I can skid on
Flat big leaves
With sharp knife edges
Leathery conker shells
Macie

Brockwell Park in autumn – poems (1)

The children have written wonderful poems about Brockwell Park.  Enjoy these ones from Kenza, Nyah, Juliette, Alamine, Nate and Sam to start with – the rest to follow in subsequent posts.

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I see?
Leaves shivering on their branches
Leaves lying on the ground like blotches of paint
Leaves spinning in the air like dancers on ice
Conkers falling from the tree like bombs
Pigeons fighting over breadcrumbs like children diving on sweets from a Pinata

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I hear?
I can hear autumn saying “I’m back”
Traffic rumbling on Norwood Road
Leaves crunching like a packet of crisps.

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I feel?
I can feel the chill in the air
The autumn dew coming through my shoes
The sun beaming through the trees onto my cheeks
Warming me
Like a cup of coffee.
Kenza

Running through Brockwell Park, what can I see?
Leaves coloured
Golden yellow
Salad green
Rose red
That’s what I see!
Chocolate brown
Gold
Caramel
Yum! That’s my favourite stuff!

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I hear?
The autumn breeze
Whistling past
My ear
Dogs barking
Children playing
Wind blowing
What a chill!
Parakeets singing
Calling me to play
I imagine I’m a parakeet
Flying through the sky

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I feel?
I feel the autumn breeze
Blowing past my ears
Chilling me.
I pick up a caramel-coloured leaf
I run my finger over the veins
And bumpy edges.
Nyah

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I see?
Leaves the colour of chestnut and pumpkin
Diving off the trees
I can see the leaves plumetting down
Making art on the ground.

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I hear?
I can hear
The wind whispering “autumn’s here”
The parakeets screeching
Up high in the golden trees
The traffic roaring past
Dogs barking
Muffled in the strong breeze.

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I feel?
The autumn sun
Beaming on my face
The sun sparkling
Through the trees like diamonds
The cold, skiddy grass
Like being on ice

An amber-coloured leaf
Floats to the ground
Like a graceful ballerina landing
I pick up the leaf
Its colourful, leathery, damp surface
Feels like a piece of soft material
Bye, bye summer!
Juliette

Walking through Brockwell Park what can I see?
Leaves dancing at autumn’s party.
Leaves gliding, twisting and turning like aeroplanes in the sky.
Leaves turning all different colours: gold, brown, orange, yellow and mustard
Pigeons fighting over food like children fighting over toys.

Walking through Brockwell Park what can I hear?
Parakeets calling and screeching.
All the children playing
And running about.
The dogs barking
Chasing squirrels
Playing with their ball.
In the distance, the cars rumbling on Norwood Road

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I feel
Autumn chill in the sky
The wetness on the grass getting into my shoe.
The sun sparkling on my cheek.
I run and skid
On the wet grass
Slipping and falling and laughing away
Running around
So much fun!
Alamine

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I see?
Leaves tumbling down from trees like circus acrobats
Leaves shaking away at their branches
Crowds of leaves on the ground like people at a football match
Bugs crawling around on the wet grass
Spiders hiding in corners of trees

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I hear?
The autumn breeze inviting me to join in
Parakeets singing a smooth melody
Leaves partying like mad
Children screaming and running.

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I feel?
I feel dampness in my socks and shoes
Wind blowing at me like a speeding car.
Nate

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I see?
Leaves the colour of toast and marmalade
Shivering on their branches
Waiting for their time to come
To dive down, down, down
Surfing on the autumn breeze
Then muscling for space
Like fans at a football match
Before coming to a rest
And forming a beautiful carpet
Of red, yellow, amber and orange
On the wet muddy ground.

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I hear?
The sound of autumn calling me
The crunching of crisp leaves
Like bacon sizzling in a frying pan
The wind whistling a tune to me.
Parakeets screeching
Children playing
Dogs barking
At the foot of the tree
Looking for the squirrel
It was chasing.

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I feel?
The autumn chill in the air
Dew on the grass
The sun’s beams of light burning on my cheeks
But they don’t warm me.

I pick up a rust red leaf
And I run my finger around
Its serrated edges
Feel the leathery texture
And I drop it back down
To rot in the soil.

I run and skid
On the wet grass
I feel the water
I feel that it’s autumn!
Sam