We all need sweets in our life – Hetty

Should sweets and crisps be banned from local stores?   This was the topic of this week’s English lessons in which the children practised persuasive writing language and techniques.  Here are arguments from Nate, Juliette and Hetty who were all against a ban but for different reasons.

Take a step outside and you will see there is litter to your left, right and everywhere. Our local area is way too polluted. We need to sort this out now or very soon. Three weeks ago when we did a survey we saw hundreds of bottles, cans, plastic and more. Some people think that we should ban sweets and crisps from the shops. I do not agree because it is going to put shops out of business and you need sugar to survive.

In my opinion, we should be allowed to have sweets and crisps for lots of reasons. Firstly, kids like them and it is part of growing. Secondly, local shops would be cut out of business. Lastly, people should be able to buy and sell whatever they want.

Even though litter is a very bad thing for our environment, we can educate ourselves to stop. I also understand that sweet and crisps are bad for us but the government should not control our diet.

To summarise, I do not think we should ban local shops from selling sweets and crisps because it would be bad for kids and bad for business.

Nate

You only need to take a glance at our local streets to see that they are covered in litter. At our school, Year 4 did a litter survey around our local streets. We saw huge amounts of litter such as cans, plastic bottles, crisp packets and sweet wrappers. Some people argue that we should ban sweets and crisps from local side shops. I believe that is a bad idea and is too extreme.

In my opinion, local shops should be allowed to sell sweets and crisps for a number of reasons. Firstly, it is a free country and people should be allowed to buy and sell whatever they want (within the law). Secondly, it is not fair on people who do not litter. Thirdly, it will not work because people will buy sweets somewhere else. Last but not least, educating people to not drop litter is a better alternative.

Even though it is a sad truth that litter does harm animals and wildlife, there are better options than banning sweets and crisps from our local shops. It is also unfortunate that sweets and crisps are bad for our health, but we are in charge of our diet, not the shops, not the government.

To sum it up, it is clear it is not a good idea to ban sweets and crisps from our shops because it is going to put some shops out of business, it won’t work, and it does not help our community, country or our planet.

Juliette

Every day I go outside I see plastic wrappers, cans and cups on the floor. At our school, we recently carried out a rubbish survey where we saw plastic cups, plastic bottles and litter of all kinds including lots of crisp packets and sweet wrappers. Some people think that they cannot do anything but they can. But I do not think they should ban local shops from selling sweets and crisps as some people want.

Firstly, if we didn’t have sweets no-one would celebrate Halloween. Secondly, if we have no sweets kids will be sad because they would get no candy at Easter. Not only that, if we do not sell them no-one would come to the shops and we would have no snacks on a long drive.

I know plastic sweet wrappers can be bad but banning sweets will not be fair to the people who go plastic free and always put wrappers in the bin and we need some sweets in our life. Not only that, if we have no sweets no-one would go to the shops and we would have no energy.

In conclusion, I think we should not ban sweets and crisps because it will not be fair, everyone will be miserable and no-one wants the world like that.

Hetty

The Victorians

We’ve started a series of lessons on the Victorians.  We’ll look at lots of different aspects of Victorian England and, by the end, aim to form an opinion on whether we should think of the Victorian era as a golden age for Britain or a dark age.

We started by looking at what seems to be a historical mystery: 

Victorian city

Why did so many people move from the countryside to cities when there was so much poverty, pollution and squalor in these cities and life expectancy was lower? 

 

Juliette set out her analysis of the reasons like this:

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Hetty wrote these interesting reflections:

I think it’s because there were lots of nice houses and better jobs and everyone was moving there.  So I think they wanted to have a fresh start in a better place because everyone said that’s what it was but actually it was really bad and boring and everyone was tired and hated it – only rich people liked it.

Brockwell Park in autumn – poems (2)

Poems by Tom, Annie, Adam, Elwood, Hetty, Chyanne, Kia, Lilah and Macie

Scooting through Brockwell Park, what can I feel?
The autumn chill
The sun shining through the trees
The soft, leathery surface of a leaf
A smooth, chocolate brown conker
A squidgy fungus.

Scooting through Brockwell Park, what can I see?
Colourful leaves and vibrant trees
Leaves decorating the path with
An emerald, orange and fire coloured carpet.
Leaves playing around on their branches
A leaf slowly fluttering down like a dying butterfly
My breath clouding in front of me.

Scooting through Brockwell Park, what can I hear?
The autumn breeze whispering in my ear
Parakeets tweeting crazy tunes
Dogs barking at squirrels
Traffic on the road ahead
Crunching leaves below my feet.
Tom

 

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I see?
Leaves surfing down like a kite floating to the ground
A carpet of amber, gold and cherry red filling the grey path
Squirrels gathering nuts, hibernating hedgehogs
And birds flying far and wide.

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I hear?
The crunching of leaves
Like burnt bacon
Parakeets screeching
Bursts of lime green in the sky.

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I feel?
The damp dew on the grass below
The smooth conker shells
Wood brown
Cold breeze on my face
By my foot a silky pigeon feather
As I dropped it, it floated to the damp grass.
Annie

 

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I see?
Leaves shivering on trees like they
Have frostbite
Swaying like a boat on a choppy sea
Waiting for their time to come
Then they let go of the branch
And ride the wind like a
Professional surfer
Before they start pushing for space
On the ground
Like a rugby scrum.

Walking through Brockwell park
What can I hear?
Parakeets screeching
Dogs barking at squirrels
The wind singing to me
People stepping on leaves that
Crunch under their feet like crisp packets.

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I feel?
The autumn chill in the breeze
Blowing in my face
Dampness
Dew
The smooth surface of a
Conker in my palm
That feels like a sheet of
Laminated paper.
I can feel it’s autumn.
Adam

 

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I see?
Squirrels fighting over acorns
Honey coloured leaves waiting to fall
Chestnuts falling like bombs!
Spiders hiding everywhere you look
Slugs waiting for rain.

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I hear?
The drone of cars on the road
The beating wings of the parakeets
The almost silent sound of the autumn breeze.

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I feel?
I feel the autumn breeze on my cheeks
I feel damp, wet, honey gold leaves
The ground is slippery and when you skid
You leave marks like slime.
Elwood

 

Walking through Brockwell Park
I can see
Acorns dropping with their friends
And family
Saying its autumn.
I can see
Leaves pushing and shoving
While I walk through the swimming pool of
Candy red, lemony yellow
And salad green leaves.

Walking through Brockwell Park
I can hear
The leaves crunching while children play.
I can hear
Parakeets screaming in the
Autumn air.
I can hear
The trees swishing in the cold
Frosty air.

Walking through Brockwell Park
I can feel
The cold autumn breeze on my face
Making me cold.
I can feel
The wet silky conkers
I can feel
The crispy rust red
Leaves under my feet.
Hetty

 

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I see?
Autumn leaves shape-shifting into tornadoes
From jade green to rust red and then crispy gold and brown
Leaves are like vibrant birds migrating through wind
Ready to say bye bye summer and shuffle off trees
As they glide down they make autumn’s carpet
Their time has come to become pieces of the earth.

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I hear?
The scene of autumn
Exploding conkers
Scurrying squirrel footsteps on dry leaves
The flapping of a parakeet
As it goes higher and higher
Fainter and fainter
Such wonderful times that give a tingle of joy
In your spine
When bursts of children laughing reaches your ears!

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I feel?
A slight chill of autumn appearing
Whistling wind on my icy toes
The concrete as uneven as can be
Beneath the conkers and acorns
The soggy grass is my mushroom grotto
I can feel the autumn signal engaging my interest
A time for the sparkling, glittering sun above me.
Chyanne

 

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I see?
Leaves crunching and crackling like crisps
Lots of leaves scattered around like
The people in the underground
A carpet of leaves over the muddy grass.

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I hear?
A sound of autumn calling me
To play outside
The wind blowing leaves
Crunching under your feet
Dogs barking to the wind.

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I feel?
A slight chill of air whipping on my cheeks
A wet, damp, marmalade leaf lying on the earth
The damp pavement like an ice skating rink
I pick up a smooth conker shell
And CRACK it went
And the shiny conker popped out.
Kia

 

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I see?
A carpet of crunchy brown leaves
Leaves scattered everywhere on
The floor like a really bad crowd
Bugs crawling in the tree
Like people in a village
Conkers falling off the tree like coconuts.

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I hear?
Parakeets singing to me
Leaves crunching in my ear
Trees rustling like a toy shaker.

Walking through Brockwell Park
What can I feel?
The autumn breeze making my ears sting
My body feels cold through like its
Frozen to ice
I can feel a red leaf so soft that
I can rub it on my ruby cheeks.
Lilah

 

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I see?
Lots of twisted trees
Really cool clouds
The leaves dancing.

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I hear?
Children collecting conkers
Parakeets screeching for food
Dogs running and barking
The autumn song.

Walking through Brockwell Park, what can I feel?
Wet damp grass that I can skid on
Flat big leaves
With sharp knife edges
Leathery conker shells
Macie

Autumn verse

The children experimented with writing verses with a similar rhythm and rhyming pattern to the poem we looked at yesterday.  The idea today was just to have fun and try out some rhymes. We’ll have a go at writing longer poems tomorrow.

School is starting
What a bummer!
Autumn’s coming
Bye bye summer!
Harry

Back to school
Acorns, conkers
Rust red leaves
Let’s go bonkers!
Tom

Autumn’s here
What a cheer
Pumpkin spiced lattes are back
But I hope there aren’t mice in my flat!
Kenza

Summer’s ending
Back to school
Lots of friends
Very cool!
Alamine

Dog’s barking
Conkers falling
Autumn’s here
How appalling!
Oscar

Summer is ending
Leaves are falling
Dogs are barking
Autumn is calling.
Reuben

Back to school
Then hibernation
Autumn’s here
An abomination.
Lynden

Autumn’s coming
Swallows fly
Down to Italy
Swooping through the sky.
Annie

Halloween
Trick or treat!
Scary costumes
Lots of sweets
Juliette

Shorter days
Brighter lights
Buying presents
What a delight!
Hetty

Autumn is colourful
Red, brown and green
Prickly conkers
Under the tree.
Thanh

Summer is over
Autumn is coming
Leaves are falling
Acorns are cracking.
Kingsley

Back to school
Autumn breeze
Grey skies
Golden trees.
Nate